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LANG TENGAH > DIVE > KARANG NIBONG
 

Lang Tengah Resort
D'Coconut Lagoon
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Karang Bahar
Karang Nibong
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Karang Bahar
Nearby Terengganu Islands
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LOCATION:
Karang Nibong is located to the northwest of Pulau Lang Tengah, almost the northernmost tip of the island. Access from the beach of Pantai Pasir Air where Redang Lang Island Resort resides is just about 10 minutes. Add a few more minutes if you are coming from D'Coconut Lagoon Resort at Pasir Mat Hassan.

In general, the dive does not exceed 15 metres of depth with average visibility of 10-15 metres. Bottom time normally range from 45 minutes to close to an hour.

DESCRIPTION:

After an eventful dive at Karang Bahar earlier, my first descent at
Karang Nibong seemed rather subdued. After all, the general visibility was quite below expectation. As the dive site is generally more suitable for a leisure afternoon dive or even orientation dive, there is not much to be seen at Karang Nibong. The variety of fish species is less although the amount of soft and hard corals can best be summed up as quite good.

The topography is rather similar with the majority of dive sites on the east coast of Peninsula Malaysia with gradual decline consisting of boulder rocks play host of a variety of soft and hard coral species which often thrive at shallow depth. Most of the landscape is dominated by colonies of lobe coral (Porites lobata) which often amass quite some number of Christmas tree worms (Spirobranchus giganteus) of dazzling colours. As there was no noticeable current during the dive, I was able to get fairly close to these tree worms to brush up on my macro photography. Other types of soft and hard coral include magnificent sea anemones (Heteractis magnifica), stony corals (Acropora sp.), finger leather corals (Sinularia sp.), leafy corals (Echinopora sp.), bulb tentacle anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor), branching staghorn (Acropora nobilis), antler corals (Pocillopora sp.), table corals (Acropora clathrata), mushroom leather corals (Sarcophyton trocheliophorum), et cetera.

As indicated earlier, there were not many fish species that can be found here. I managed to spot dusky anemonefish (Amphiprion melanopus, also known as red-black anemonefish), clown anemonefish (Amphiprion percula), schooling big-eye snapper (Lutjanus lutjanus), blue-ring angelfish (Pomacanthus annularis), gold-banded fusilier (Caesio caerulaurea) and a giant grouper which slipped away into the depth. The dive site also hosts quite a number of giant clams (Tridacna crocea), crown-of-thorn starfish (Acanthaster planci) and varicose nudibranch (Phyllidia varicosa) which was the biggest I have ever seen yet.

Overall, the lack of much interest at
Karang Nibong makes it more of an average dive site with shallow depth. That means one can dive here as close to an hour before resurfacing. The dive site is also good for close-up photography practice due to the lack of strong currents as well as some good variety of coral species that thrive on the shallows. In fact, I really treasured some shots of sea anemones that I took here, in which I deployed in macro mode and good stability.

MY RATING:

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